South Korea

SOKOR Government crackdown on public sector trade unions intensifies

PSI has written to the Korean President, Mr Lee Myung-Bak, strongly condemning the recent violations of trade union rights and is calling on affiliates and the trade union movement to send similar letters of protest to the Korean Government as well as to the Korean Embassies in their countries and to their Foreign Ministries. Since coming into power in February 2008, the Government of Lee Myung-Bak has pursued an agenda of downsizing the public sector and outsourcing public services.

KHMU battle health commercialisation and bargaining

KHMU BATTLE HEALTH COMMERCIALISATION AND BARGAINING
http://bogun.nodong.org/english/info.htm
 
(2007)  This year, the Korean Health & Medical Workers' Union (KHMU) has faced critical struggles on two fronts. The first struggle is to stop the retrogressive revision of a medical law aiming at commercializing the health sector. Another one is to amicably conclude the 2007 national bargaining.
 

Partnenariat Corée/Côte d'Ivoire dans le secteur de l'électricité

Africa Energy Intelligence July 25, 2007 Partnership with Seoul SECTION: GOVERNMENT STRATEGIES LENGTH: 197 words Ivory Coast energy minister Leon Emmanuel Monnet travelled to Seoul last week to sign a memorandum of understanding with his South Korean counterpart, Kim Young-ju. Korean groups are keen to invest in Ivory Coast's electricity sector but also in the country's offshore. Last year Abidjan took part in a South Korea/Africa conference staged in Seoul between Nov. 7-9.

SOUTH KOREA POWER NEWS (2005)

SOUTH KOREA POWER NEWS (2005) from Energy Briefing - Asia Pulse

SRI LANKA POWER NEWS (2005)

SRI LANKA POWER NEWS (2005) from Energy Briefing - Asia Pulse

ADB-Korea partnership to train water & sanitation operators in South Asia

The training program aims to boost the capacity of utilities to manage and provide quality services; training, venue and equipment is provided by Korea Water Resources Corporation (K-water). Two water and sanitation operators from separate South Asian cities will be chosen for the project. K-water, which has extensive experience in coaching water and sanitation staff, will develop and carry out the program, with the aim of replicating it at other utilities in future. As part of the training, the participants will prepare new business and action plans, which will be checked for evidence of improvements on existing plans, involving top policy decision makers down to technical managers.

How ADB water projects affect PSI unions

Corral, Violeta P. (Feb 2009), PSIRU: ADB’s Water Policy – How it affects PSI Unions in Philippines, Indonesia and Nepal, and similar Reforms in Japan and Korea.

PUP: Korea Water/Korea – DWASA/Bangladesh twinning

Dhaka Water Supply and Sewerage Authority (DWASA) serves 10 million customers and relies on ground water as its source, including wells and the nearby river. It has great difficulty sustaining high water quality and service continuity. In contrast, its twinning partner— K Water— has superior water quality results and provides 24/7 supply to an equally large population. In this twinning deal, improving water quality is the immediate target. K Water is a state-owned water utility responsible for water resources management and bulk water supply; it has assisted local governments with capacity building and technical consultancy for their water supply systems since 1980s. With its financial and technical capabilities and community support, K-water has gained a reputation for its expertise and seen as an alternative to private sector and as a partner for water services delivery.

Dhaka Water (Bangladesh) - Korea Water (Daejon) twinning under ADB-WOP

Korea Water (Daejon) is 'expert twin' to 'recipient twin' Dhaka Water Supply and Sewerage Authority (Bangladesh) under the Water Operators Partnership (WOP) program of Asian Development Bank. Dhaka Water serves 10 million customers and relies on ground water as its source, including wells and the nearby river. It has great difficulty sustaining high water quality and service continuity. In contrast, its twinning partner— K Water— has superior water quality results and provides 24/7 supply to an equally large population. In this twinning deal, improving water quality is the immediate target. Twinning as a development strategy has been around since the first millennium. In many cases, towns, universities, and other entities located in geographically distinct areas, but sharing similar characteristics, pair off to foster human contact, cultural exchange, or knowledge sharing. ADB has adopted and improved on this strategy for its WOPs Program. The WOPs program promotes knowledge sharing and builds the capacity of water operators and utilities in the Asia and the Pacific region. Among its key initiatives is the twinning of 20 water utilities and operators. Whereas most twinning arrangements pair off entities with similar characteristics on the assumption that they will share similar problems and solutions, ADB’s approach is to match a stronger water and sanitation utility (expert) with a developing utility (recipient). The aim is to enable the latter to improve service coverage and delivery, financial sustainability, and other aspects of its performance. [http://www.adb.org/Water/Water-Briefs/twinning.asp]

Korea Water - Nonsan City PUP

Initiated in 2004, the partnership between Nonsan City and K-water, a public water utility, is the first PUP ever formed in the water sector for a municipality in South Korea. Its objective is to reduce NRW by exploring new technologies and practices to improve distribution management and lower operating costs. Nonsan city was under financial pressure in water services and as indicated in the statistics, one of the poorest water providers in terms of management and operations. K-water proposed a partnership with a particular focus on NRW reduction programs. The partnership was welcomed by the mayor, local parliament and NGOs. The drivers for the partnership are: • Growing budgetary constraints on funding • Lack of managerial and technical capability • Call for better water services from constituents • Acknowledgement of added value of the partner. The Nonsan-K Water PUP is based on a concession contract that reflected client needs, but accommodated target and performance elements. Contractual elements – 30 years of concession period (2004 onwards) • US$50 million to invest in mains replacement/ rehabilitation with a target ROE of 3 %(100% equity investment) • Water tariff is inflation protected • Water tariff collection by municipality • Take over of existing employees • K-water paid management services fee per cubic meter supplied. The scope of work includes – Mains replacement/rehabilitation; Network modeling/GIS; Leak detection/repair; Operation of customer (call) center; Water tariff billing. After four years of the PUP, NRW was reduced from 47% to 30%; Customer Satisfaction Index increased from 56 to 76; Water Tariff decreased from 854 Won/m3 to 826 Won/m3.

Korea Water-Local Govt PUPs to improve municipal water supply

The Evolving Idea of Public-Public Partnership (“PUPs”) Water in Sector --
K-water, a state-owned bulk water supplier has assisted local governments
with capacity building and technical consultancy for their water supply systems
since 1980s. With its financial and technical capabilities and community support, K-water has gained a reputation for its expertise and seen as an alternative to private sector and as an partner for water services delivery. The motivation differs between local governments. However, local governments want technical and managerial expertise rather than funding sources, so that water services are delivered at an affordable price and in a stable manner. K-water’s Partnership with Municipal Governments: (i) Mostly partnering with municipalities with financial and technical problems formed partnerships with 13 municipalities to date and plan to sign additional 50 municipalities by 2015; (ii) K-water’s planned equity investment for 13 municipal water system: 600 million US$; (iii) K-Water is not profit-driven, and return on invested capital is only 3 ~3.26%; (iv) K-water also engaged in the operations of 11 wastewater treatment facilities on a PUPs basis. PUPs Development : Key Messages -- (i) Like PPP, PUPs can also ensure efficiency in the provisioning of water services non-revenue water including decreasing the non water, providing affordable and accessible water for all, ensure water quality and the accountability of the water authority to the public. (ii) The success of PUPs relies on their not for-profit basis and retention of public operations, with the collaboration being stimulated by mutual trust and understanding and public sector ethos. (iii) PUPs aims at creating win-win situation at the public-public interface and should be dealt with in an economically sensible way. (iv) The Community is an important partner in the PUPs relationship; Nonsan PUPs would not be successful without support from them.

Boosting Performance through Twinning

Twinning as a development strategy has been around since the first millennium. In many cases, towns, universities, and other entities located in geographically distinct areas, but sharing similar characteristics, pair off to foster human contact, cultural exchange, or knowledge sharing. ADB has adopted and improved on this strategy for its Water Operators’ Partnership (WOPs) Program. The WOPs program promotes knowledge sharing and builds the capacity of water operators and utilities in the Asia and the Pacific region. Among its key initiatives is the twinning of 20 water utilities and operators. With the exception the Phnom Penh Water Supply Authority (Cambodia) and Binh Duong Water Supply Sewerage Environment Company (Viet Nam) partnership, which commenced in July 2007, ADB has completed six of seven currently operational twinning arrangements between November 2007 to June 2008.

Korea water (newsclips 2005-jun07)

Compilation of news re Korea water sector

Boosting Performance through Twinning

Haiphong and Da Nang towns in Vietnam share one big challenge—providing quality and reliable drinking water services to their communities in the most economical and efficient way possible. Haiphong does this better than Da Nang, so in May 2008, Haiphong committed to help Da Nang under a twinning program initiated by ADB, one of eight utility twinning agreements established under ADB’s WOP.

ASIA: Workers campaigns vs water privatization

ADB plays a lead role in water sector reforms in the Asia-Pacific region. Sri Lanka was among the first of ADB’s ’guinea pig’ as a prime candidate to lead South Asia into private sector participation/PSP in water supplies’; in 1997, ADB provided assistance to change Sri Lankan water law. In 2000, ADB helped prepare a PSP management contract in Nepal as precondition for its support to the controversial US$464-million Melamchi Water Supply Project, with co-financing from JBIC and other donors. In 2005, ADB organized a forum in Bangalore (India) to draw up PSP action plans in India's urban water supply for the states of Kerala, Karnataka, Madya Pradesh, Uttaranchal and Jammu-Kashmir; target participants are from State Water Utilities in India and overseas private water companies. In 2009, ADB will approve a new $50M loan in the Philippines for a Water District Development Sector Project that aims to promote a ‘bankable’ sector investment program and capacity development for government-owned and -controlled water districts. ADB has also provided technical assistance and other forms of support to the two private water concessionaires in Manila (privatized with WB-IFC financing in 1996). Last May 2007, PSI organized a forum on ADB’s Water Policy at ADB’s 40th Annual Meeting and People’s Forum on ADB in Kyoto (Japan) where PSI water affiliates from the Philippines, Indonesia, Nepal, Japan and Korea raised awareness of harmful impacts of water privatization and argued for public sector solutions. Below are highlights of their presentations.

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