Maldives

ADB-WOPs: Maldives-Bhutan twinning

Following Maldives’ Malé Water and Sewerage Company Pvt. Ltd. advice, Thimphu City Corporation of Bhutan has minimized illegal connections and increased revenue with detection of unbilled connections. [FROM: WATERMARK, February 2009, ADB-WOPs newsletter, http://www.juscoltd.com/Water%20Mark%203.pdf ]

MWSC (Maldives) – Thimphu City Corporation (Bhutan) twinning

Malé Water and Sewerage Company (MWSC) is 'expert twin' to 'recipient twin' Thimphu City Corporation in the twinning program. Malé has committed to work with Thimphu to get their NRW down from around 37% to 15%. Malé has an almost unbelievable 2% NRW driven by the need to save on expensive desalinated water. MWSC was created in 1995 when the Government of Maldives abolished the Maldives Water and Sanitation Authority (MWSA) and converted it into a Regulatory Body, while at the same time creating MWSC as a joint venture with the private sector. MWSC is 70% owned by the government, 18% owned by IFU (Danish Industrialization Fund for Developing Countries) and 12% owned by Danish firm NTH Holding/HOH Water Technology. MWSC's primary goal is to produce and distribute desalinated water on a commercial basis, with viability and sustainability as the important key words. In the mid-90s, Malé was experiencing intense water shortages. The underground aquifer, once the major source of water for all purposes, was depleted of fresh water and displaced by brackish or salt water. Rainwater harvesting became an alternative solution but could not meet all the demands for water. Private sector participation was chosen as the best solution to reduce the financial burden and risk to the government, increase operational efficiency and transparency, attract better personnel, and allow the use of best technology available in the market.

Malé Water & Sewerage Company Pvt. Ltd (MWSC)

Malé Water & Sewerage Company Pvt. Ltd (MWSC) was established in 1995 when the Government of Maldives (GoM) abolished the Maldives Water and Sanitation Authority (MWSA) and converted it into a Regulatory Body, while creating MWSC in joint venture with the private sector. MWSC is 70% owned by the government, 18% owned by IFU (Danish Industrialization Fund for Developing Countries) and 12% owned by Danish firm NTH Holding/HOH Water Technology. MWSC's primary goal is to produce and distribute desalinated water for Malé on a commercial basis, with viability and sustainability as the important key words. In the mid 90s, Malé was experiencing intense water shortages. The underground aquifer, once the major source of water for all purposes, was depleted of fresh water and displaced by brackish or salt water. Rainwater harvesting became an alternative solution but could not meet all the demands for water. Private sector participation (PSP) was considered to reduce the financial burden and risk to the government, increase operational efficiency and transparency, attract better personnel, and allow the use of best technology available in the market.

Male Water (Maldives) - Thimphu Municipal Corporation (Bhutan) twinning under ADB-WOP

Male Water and Sewerage Company Pvt. Ltd. is 'expert twin' to 'recipient twin' Thimphu Municipal Corporation under the Water Operators Partnership (WOP) program of Asian Development Bank. Malé has committed to work with Thimphu to get their nonrevenue water (NRW) down from around 37% to 15%. Malé has an almost unbelievable 2% NRW driven by the need to save on expensive desalinated water. Twinning as a development strategy has been around since the first millennium. In many cases, towns, universities, and other entities located in geographically distinct areas, but sharing similar characteristics, pair off to foster human contact, cultural exchange, or knowledge sharing. ADB has adopted and improved on this strategy for its Water Operators’ Partnership (WOPs) Program. The WOPs program promotes knowledge sharing and builds the capacity of water operators and utilities in the Asia and the Pacific region. Among its key initiatives is the twinning of 20 water utilities and operators. Whereas most twinning arrangements pair off entities with similar characteristics on the assumption that they will share similar problems and solutions, ADB’s approach is to match a stronger water and sanitation utility (expert) with a developing utility (recipient). The aim is to enable the latter to improve service coverage and delivery, financial sustainability, and other aspects of its performance.

Syndicate content