Bangladesh

Dhaka Water (Bangladesh) - Korea Water (Daejon) twinning under ADB-WOP

Korea Water (Daejon) is 'expert twin' to 'recipient twin' Dhaka Water Supply and Sewerage Authority (Bangladesh) under the Water Operators Partnership (WOP) program of Asian Development Bank. Dhaka Water serves 10 million customers and relies on ground water as its source, including wells and the nearby river. It has great difficulty sustaining high water quality and service continuity. In contrast, its twinning partner— K Water— has superior water quality results and provides 24/7 supply to an equally large population. In this twinning deal, improving water quality is the immediate target. Twinning as a development strategy has been around since the first millennium. In many cases, towns, universities, and other entities located in geographically distinct areas, but sharing similar characteristics, pair off to foster human contact, cultural exchange, or knowledge sharing. ADB has adopted and improved on this strategy for its WOPs Program. The WOPs program promotes knowledge sharing and builds the capacity of water operators and utilities in the Asia and the Pacific region. Among its key initiatives is the twinning of 20 water utilities and operators. Whereas most twinning arrangements pair off entities with similar characteristics on the assumption that they will share similar problems and solutions, ADB’s approach is to match a stronger water and sanitation utility (expert) with a developing utility (recipient). The aim is to enable the latter to improve service coverage and delivery, financial sustainability, and other aspects of its performance. [http://www.adb.org/Water/Water-Briefs/twinning.asp]

Boosting Performance through Twinning

Twinning as a development strategy has been around since the first millennium. In many cases, towns, universities, and other entities located in geographically distinct areas, but sharing similar characteristics, pair off to foster human contact, cultural exchange, or knowledge sharing. ADB has adopted and improved on this strategy for its Water Operators’ Partnership (WOPs) Program. The WOPs program promotes knowledge sharing and builds the capacity of water operators and utilities in the Asia and the Pacific region. Among its key initiatives is the twinning of 20 water utilities and operators. With the exception the Phnom Penh Water Supply Authority (Cambodia) and Binh Duong Water Supply Sewerage Environment Company (Viet Nam) partnership, which commenced in July 2007, ADB has completed six of seven currently operational twinning arrangements between November 2007 to June 2008.

Bangladesh water (newsclips 2005-jun07)

Compilation of news re Bangladesh water sector

ADB’s Power / Energy Projects in Asia-Pacific (as of May 2008)

Asian Development Bank (ADB) extends loans and provides technical assistance to its developing member countries for a broad range of development projects and programs. ADB identified core sectors for its assistance as road transport, energy, urban infrastructure, rural infrastructure, education, and financial services. In recent years, ADB has increasingly placed more emphasis on its private sector operations. In 2007, ADB approved $10.1 billion of loans, $673 million of grant projects, and technical assistance ($243 million). Private sector operations totaled $1.7 billion, significantly above recent levels. Most assistance went to the operational sector, with 39% of total loans (or $3.9 billion) going to transport and communications, more than double the amount in 2006.

ADB & Power Sector

In a 2000 review of its 1995 Energy Policy, the ADB was mandated to pursue private sector involvement in restructuring the energy sector in the Asia-Pacific region. In the power subsector, reforms that form part of ADB loan conditionalities include “unbundling” the power sector to introduce competition, strengthening of regulatory bodies, elimination of cross-subsidies, and promotion of electricity trading. As of 2002, more than half of ADB’s total energy loans supported the restructuring or privatization of the power sector. (At the World Bank the proportion was even higher -- since 1993, between 75% and 93% of all power sector lending by the WB was to sustain restructuring or privatization.) The ADB has taken the lead in supporting power restructuring programs in the following countries/subregions: Philippines, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS), and several states in India.

ADB/WB Projects in Bangladesh WSS Sector

This compilation provides a description of major Asian Development Bank (ADB) and World Bank (WB) activities – loans, technical assistance, events, papers, etc – in the water supply and sanitation sector in Bangladesh over the past five years (2001-2005).

Boosting Performance through Twinning

Haiphong and Da Nang towns in Vietnam share one big challenge—providing quality and reliable drinking water services to their communities in the most economical and efficient way possible. Haiphong does this better than Da Nang, so in May 2008, Haiphong committed to help Da Nang under a twinning program initiated by ADB, one of eight utility twinning agreements established under ADB’s WOP.

Stocktaking of Water and Sanitation Sector and Private Sector Involvement in Selected Asian Countries

This background note is part of a wider program carried out by the OECD on “Sustainable financing to ensure affordable access to water and sanitation.” The program includes the development of practical guidance for governments wishing to engage the private sector in the development and management of water and sanitation infrastructure, based on the newly released OECD Principles for Private Sector Participation in Infrastructure.

ADB- & WB-funded power reforms in Bangladesh

IFI-funded power sector reforms in Bangladesh was initiated in 1996 with the creation of a new company, Power Grid Company of Bangladesh (PGCB). Various ADB loans -- including US$268-million Power Sector Development Program approved in 2003 -- supported power restructuring and corporatizaton of PGCB and ’successor’ entities. These reforms involve human resource issues such as employee retrenchment plans and retirement or gratuity benefit schemes, which may be unfunded. In case of PGCB, unfunded pension obligations and gratuities amounted to US$8 million that affect 1,270 employees.

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